20+ Of The Best Responses To Kanye West Saying Slavery Was A Choice


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What’s one route to change your way of thinking in this crazy parenting life?

Even before your eyes open, your head is on “step on it” mode. Pack lunch: ham sandwiches, baby carrots, and raisins, durations two. Discontinue kids off at clas. Next stop: nappies from Target( don’t forget the talent for the baby rain ). Get the minivan serviced. Make an appointment for the two-year-old’s well-child scrutiny( before she makes three ). School pick-up, Taekwondo categorizes in the afternoon, followed by a speedy stop at Walgreens. Thank God for the drive-through at the neighborhood Walgreens. Speaking of drive-throughs, that’s maybe what’s for dinner tonight.

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You’re tired before you even get out of bottom. There’s a bajillion occasions you utterly have to do today. You curb a groan as you groggily turn off the alarm and steel yourself for the day ahead.

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But here’s a anticipate: what if you and I replaced the “have to” with the words “get to? ” Those two simple-minded commands- “get to”- have the power to transform our perspective on parenting.

You SPTAG 5 TTget to pack lunch for the kids.

You SPTAG 6 TTget to take them to school.

You SPTAG 7 TTget to make them to the doctor and to their after-school lessons.

You SPTAG 8 TTget to be their cook, their chauffeur, and their occurrence planner.




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Two years ago, my family and I moved from the U.S. to India where my husband and I were born and fostered. For 12 years before that we lived in a suburbium of Portland, Oregon. We had both ended grad school in the U.S. Then approached love, union, and two children( born 17 months apart) in a baby carriage( more like a McLaren LX stroller ). We loved our white-picket-fence life in suburbia. We were living the American Dream. Then, for a bunch of various types of non-dramatic concludes, we moved to India.

We lived a blessed life in America. We continue to live a life of more-than-enough in India. This wasn’t one of those Mother Theresa, let’s-make-this-world-a-better-place moves. We moved with a place that would provide fairly for our everyday needs and then some.

But every day, as person or persons of liberty in India, I originate face-to-face with the fact that I “get to” rather than I “have to.”

As I make my kids to clas in an air-conditioned vehicle, we pass by babes sitting on embankments of beach outside construction sites where their parents succeed. Their naturally black “hairs-breadth” is now bleached blond by the daylight. Their mummies carry pilings of bricks and bags of plaster through unfinished builds. They don’t have the option of taking their their children to clas. My “have to wake up when my iPhone horrify resounds at 6:30 a.m.” disorders seem horrendously petty.

Moments like these are laced through my day.

As I enjoy the rain from my penthouse apartment with its round-the-clock security guards and swimming bath, I look out the window to the street below me to appreciate their own families squatted under a blue-blooded tarp they announce home. They don’t “re going to have to” procreate the berths. They sleep on cloaks on the hard floor.

As I leave the convenience store with nonsense that I don’t actually necessary, I am assembled on the sidewalk by small children trying to sell me a coloring bible or a knot of pencils. Her mom doesn’t have to do homework with her. In all likelihood, neither of them knows how to read.

Read more: boredpanda.com


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